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Fluid Fertiliser Archives


After six years, where the heck are we? Where are we going? Updated 24/03/04
Bob Holloway, Brendan Frischke, Dot Brace, SARDI Minnipa Mike McLaughlin, Enzo Lombi, Caroline Johnston, Therese McBeath, Sam Stacey, CSIRO Land and Water Roger Armstrong, DPI Horsham.

We now have more than 100 comparisons of a range of fluid and granular fertilisers conducted by our group on Central and Upper Eyre Peninsula over the past six years. With all this data, can we now say whether fluids have a place in our South Australian Farming systems, or even in other States? The first step is to look at what we have from Eyre Peninsula, and then see what is now happening in other areas. Read More

Will there be benefits on our soil types? [top] Updated 24/03/04
Dr Mike McLaughlin, Enzo Lombi, Caroline Johnston CSIRO Land and Water, Therese McBeath, Sam Stacey, University of Adelaide, Roger Armstrong Victorian Department of Primary Industries (Horsham), Bob Holloway and Brendan Frischke, SARDI (Minnipa).

Calcareous and acid soils are widespread in Australia and their agricultural use accounts for a significant fraction of the crop production nationwide. However, these soils provide significant challenges for management of crop P nutrition due to rapid fixation of P (reactions which "lock up" fertiliser P into forms that are not available to crops). Fluid fertilisers have produced significant yield increases over and above those achieved with conventional granular products. However, to date, trials have only been undertaken on a narrow range of alkaline soils. Fluid fertilisers need to be trialed on a wider range of soil types so that farmers can predict whether fluid fertilisers will benefit their own farming enterprises. Read More

Why are we interested in them in SA? Are they worth trying in Qld? [top] Updated 24/03/04
Bob Holloway, Brendan Frischke, Dot Brace, SARDI Minnipa Mike McLaughlin, Enzo Lombi, Caroline Johnston, Therese McBeath, Sam Stacey, CSIRO Land and Water Roger Armstrong, DPI Horsham.

We started investigating fluid fertilisers in SA in 1998 because of a major problem with wheat production on a group of grey highly calcareous soils (10-90% calcium carbonate) covering a large part of western Eye Peninsula. Mean yields had not increased in this area for forty years. Research showed that granular phosphorus (P) fertilisers could be added to these soils at ever increasing rates - up to 100 kg P/ha - with only very slight responses. Most of the P added was being rapidly fixed and while the total P concentrations in the soil were high (e.g. 700 mg P/kg soil), the available P concentrations were very low, so plants continually suffered from poor tillering and uneven ripening, classic symptoms of P deficiency. Read More

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