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Dr Mike McLaughlin
Dr Enzo Lombi
Dr Roger Armstrong
Dr Bob Holloway
Brendan Frischke
Sam Stacey
Jim Kelly
Kristi Lamond


Dr Mike McLaughlin
Research Director

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CSIRO Land and Water
Address: PMB 2 URRBRAE
South Australia 5064
Phone: +61 8 8303 8433
Fax: +61 8 8303 8565 [Top]

Mike McLaughlin is a Research Director in CSIRO Land and Water and also holds a joint Professorial position with the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Adelaide. He currently leads the GRDC project investigating fluid fertilisers in southern Australia. His research interests span the chemistry and plant uptake of trace and pollutant elements in soils, and the chemistry of heavy metals and fertiliser elements in soils.



Dr Enzo Lombi
Research Scientist

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CSIRO Land and Water
Address: PMB 2 URRBRAE
South Australia 5064
Phone: +61 8 8303 8476
Fax: +61 8 8303 8565

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Enzo is principal investigator in a large project assessing the potential of fluid fertilisers to enhance crop productivity and reduce phosphorous losses. This has involved fundamental research on chemical speciation of phosphorus and micronutrients in soil, and investigation of soil-plant interactions with respect to nutrients acquisition.


Dr Roger Armstrong
Senior Agronomist

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Department of Primary Industries, Victoria
Address: PMB 260 HORSHAM
Victoria 3401
Phone: +61 3 5362 2336
Fax: +61 3 5362 2187

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Roger Armstrong is the Senior Agronomist with the Department of Primary Industries research arm PIRVic at Horsham in Victoria . He is also a Honorary Senior Research Fellow with the University of Melbourne . He leads the Victorian component of the GRDC Fluid fertiliser project in collaboration with CSIRO and SARDI. He has a strong background in plant nutrition, especially phosphorus and nitrogen dynamics. The team he leads at Horsham conducts is also heavily involved in research into general soil - plant –water interactions with a focus on subsoil limitations and sustainable rotations in semi-arid environments.


Dr Bob Holloway
Officer in Charge
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South Australia Research and
Development Institute (SARDI)
Address: Minnipa Agriculture Centre
PO Box 31 MINNIPA
South Australia 5654
Phone: +61 8 8680 6203
Fax: +61 8 8680 5020

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Photo Not Yet Available Brendan Frischke
Research Officer

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South Australia Research and
Development Institute (SARDI)
Address: Minnipa Agriculture Centre
PO Box 31 MINNIPA
South Australia 5654
Phone: +61 8 8680 6206
Fax: +61 8 8680 5020

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I joined the project the fluid fertiliser research team at the start of the project CSO-231 in January 2002 and am based at Minnipa Agricultural Centre on Eyre Peninsula. Before joining the project I worked at Minnipa for two years in canola and pulse breeding evaluation and agronomy in low rainfall areas. During this time I was exposed to early fluid fertiliser research based at Minnipa and assisted adapting fluid s to existing machines. I also spent four years on a family farm on Eyre Peninsula after completing a Bachelor of Engineering degree.

My role in the current project has been investigating the effects of fluid delivery system design and application volume on the performance of fluid fertilisers applied at sowing with seeding equipment. My role also includes investigating high-pressure injection of fluids as a means of delivering fluid nutrients at depth with tillage or into established crops in dry environments.


Sam Stacey
PhD Student

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School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Address:University of Adelaide
PMB 1 Glen Osmond
South Australia 5064
Phone: +61 8 8303 7398
Fax: +61 8 8303 6511

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The aim of my PhD is to develop new forms of micronutrient fertilisers that will be more effective on calcareous and alkaline soils, which dominate some of Australia's most important cereal cropping regions: South Australia's Upper Eyre Peninsula and Mallee; Victoria's Wimmera and Mallee regions; and Western Australia's Eastern Wheat Belt. Micronutrients are less 'plant-available' at high soil pH, which means that the efficiency of conventional micronutrient fertilisers can be relatively poor. Another problem is that some micronutrients (manganese and zinc) react with Ammonium Polyphosphate (APP) in the fertiliser tank. The reaction can lead to blocked nozzles and, at worst, create a sticky mess.

One way of overcoming this problem is to use chelated micronutrients. I have collected a range of new chelating agents and will be assessing whether they improve the efficiency of micronutrient fertilisers as well as reduce their reactions in the fertiliser tank. I have already established that some of these chelating agents complex micronutrients much more effectively than EDTA, and they do reduce the reaction between micronutrient fertilisers and APP. We still need to determine how they will react in soils and whether they will effectively supply micronutrients to field crops.

We would also like to develop micronutrient fertilisers that are absorbed much more readily by crop plants. We already know that plants find it difficult to absorb many conventional chelating agents, so we would like to develop a fertiliser that crops can absorb more easily. Our trials will cover both foliar and soil application of these interesting fertilisers. We would like to stress that both experiments are in their infancy but early signs look promising.


Jim Kelly
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Manager
Phone: +61 8 8303 6709
Fax: +61 8 8303 6752
Mobile: 0427 821 625

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Kristi Lamond
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Administration Manager
Phone: +61 8 8303 6706
Fax: +61 8 8303 6752
Mobile: 0421 619 333

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